Each year, the Neediest Cases Fund holds a fund-raising campaign during the holiday season, with stories in The New York Times describing the travails of families and individuals in distress. The Neediest Cases Fund then distributes the funds from the campaign to seven large multi-service agencies that serve New Yorkers of all denominations in the metropolitan area. The New York Times Company covers all administrative costs of the program, so every dollar donated to the Neediest Cases Fund goes directly to provide for those in need through the seven agencies. The Neediest Cases Fund may also contribute funds from its endowment to address an immediate and urgent need.

These are the portraits taken for that campaign...

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Darius Cummings, 34, a full-time student and father of his seven-year-old son, Jadice found himself caring for an ailing uncle while also providing additional support for his father, Illinois Cummings. Then his mother passed in April then a few months later his uncle passed away in June. While he is still grieving the deaths of his mother and uncle he is looking forward to graduating from college, a goal his mother cared about a great deal and providing a safety net for his family. Michael Noble Jr. for the New York Times

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Keith Ford, 23, was 18 when his mother threw him out of their home during his senior year of high school at Voyages Preparatory Academy in Queens. Self-conscious and concerned about how his classmates and teachers would react, Ford said he kept his homelessness a secret. For the remainder of his senior year he “couch-surfed” at friends’ homes or slept on the subway. He survived on the food he saved from school, but oftentimes did not eat. Ford lives with his fiancé, Tanaeja Wright, in her parents, Brooklyn apartment. They are hoping to move out and get their own place soon. They plan to get married in 2020 and his long-term goal is to go to college and become an architect. Michael Noble Jr. for the New York Times

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Roscoe Boyd, 37,rehearses “Sweet, Sweet Spirit” before his performance at the 22nd annual Derrick Bell Lecture in the Vanderbilt Hall at New York University. Michael Noble Jr. for the New York Times

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anasia Horne is an 18-year-old homeless student, photographed on November 1, 2017 at Brooklyn High School for Leadership and Community Service (BHSLCS) in the schools studio classroom. For the past two years, Horne, her parents and 15-year-old brother have been in and out of shelters and are still looking for a more permanent home in Brooklyn close to the high school. After a few months at Leadership, everything has made a dramatic change for the better. Horne couldn’t believe the change -the school helped her understand her class work better than before and has helped her as a person and with her attendance. Currently, Horne excelling in her film/multimedia class with teachers saying she’s a natural in front of and behind the camera. Michael Noble Jr. for the New York Times

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Malik Glanville is originally from Jamaica and moved to the United States with his father when he was just a kid. For most of his life, Malik has lived with his father but he and his father have never been on good terms and it resulted in Malik sleeping from house to house, always traveling with a backpack. Malik struggles in school because he is worried and anxious about his living situation and the way he presents himself – he has nowhere to call home and barely any things to call his own.

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Atreyal Ransom, 19, of Brooklyn poses for a portrait at the O'Dwyer Community Center where he found a second home volunteering. At an early age, Ransom experienced the loss of his mother to cancer and was raised by his grandmother and older brother. He was always a quiet and isolated student and had very few friends in school. He went on to spend his free time volunteering 3,000 hours at O’Dwyer Gardens Community Center he wanted to give back to the center that he considers his second home. CREDIT: Michael Noble Jr. for the New York Times

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Roscoe Boyd, 37, poses for a portrait in his Harlem apartment. Boyd is a volunteer and advocate who has created meaningful impact for our member agencies and through the NYT Neediest Cases funded annual Toy Drive.

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